Thread So does anyone actually have a problem with women serving in active combat roles?

DJBrenton

In Her Majesty's Secret Cervix
Feb 10, 2010
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Robin Hoodland
Oh, and while we're putting you straight Duke. The very article you posted contained the following.

For Sir Hew Strachan, a brigadier general and military historian, the character of war has changed so significantly women are already “directly in dangerous positions.”
He told the Daily Express: “The notion that somehow there is a frontline into which you put men and a rear area where women can serve is no longer true in these sorts of wars. Women are already in the frontline.”

 

DJBrenton

In Her Majesty's Secret Cervix
Feb 10, 2010
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I think, in fairness, that there is a perception that the 'front line' is infantry. At one time this may well have been relevant as only the infantry was in the direct line of fire. With actions such as Afghanistan, however, there are plenty of non-infantry roles at FOB's that can come under fire and may well have to fire back. These situations don't necessarily require the same elements of strength and stamina that infantry posts might need.
 

Sarcasmo

A Taste Of Honey Fluff Boy
Mar 28, 2005
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I thought the front line was a zig-zaggy trench in which men lived and died amongst muck and filth and rats and gore in gas masks and with naught but moldy bread to eat. That's what it is in my head, at least.
 

Mr. Argumentor

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Sep 27, 2012
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asastang
And do you think women can't do it then?
I already posted my opinion, goober.
My concern is that infantry has traditionally been the Army's dumping ground where they toss people not qualified for anything else. Generally those men can be trained to be decent soldiers, but if someone just does not have the strength to do it long term there could be issues.
I would like to see it stay a volunteer thing for a good while.

Still enough to know the stresses by being in the environment though. That wasnt a bash in any way. Hell, it might have helped you come home when you might not have if you were outside the wire more often.
I know it wasnt a bash and didnt take it as such.
 

DJBrenton

In Her Majesty's Secret Cervix
Feb 10, 2010
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I thought the front line was a zig-zaggy trench in which men lived and died amongst muck and filth and rats and gore in gas masks and with naught but moldy bread to eat. That's what it is in my head, at least.

Blackadder was not a documentary.
 

Dory Berkowitz-Bukowski

Ready for some Heroin
Oct 15, 2004
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Blackadder was not a documentary.

Say what???

Hugh-Laurie-7354.jpg



Bonus for any yanks who know who that is.
 

Mr. Argumentor

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I think, in fairness, that there is a perception that the 'front line' is infantry. At one time this may well have been relevant as only the infantry was in the direct line of fire. With actions such as Afghanistan, however, there are plenty of non-infantry roles at FOB's that can come under fire and may well have to fire back. These situations don't necessarily require the same elements of strength and stamina that infantry posts might need.

A mechanic has to go out on every convoy in case there are issues. Several of my friends that only got about 2 months of training in conducting themselves in battle ended up in fire fights in the early days.
But that is the Air Force. Our Army trains everyone as a rifleman first and a mechanic/IT-Tech/Admin/whatever-their-actual-job-is-second. This helps them survive, but the average soldier ends up as only a decent whatever. At least thats what it used to be
 

DJBrenton

In Her Majesty's Secret Cervix
Feb 10, 2010
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Robin Hoodland
A mechanic has to go out on every convoy in case there are issues. Several of my friends that only got about 2 months of training in conducting themselves in battle ended up in fire fights in the early days.
But that is the Air Force. Our Army trains everyone as a rifleman first and a mechanic/IT-Tech/Admin/whatever-their-actual-job-is-second. This helps them survive, but the average soldier ends up as only a decent whatever. At least thats what it used to be

Everyone gets some basic weapons training here too but real REMFs will never use it. Nowadays though, as you say, there are plenty of trades who can find themselves in combat accidentally.