Ontopic The 3D printing thread

fly

Osharts 11
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If the hole tool, or whatever fusion calls it, doesn't work you should be able to create physical threads

Here's the SW method
You can, but they didn't work for whatever reason. I used the standard thread for beer taps, but it was too small and the threads seemed *very* thin.
 

gee

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You can, but they didn't work for whatever reason. I used the standard thread for beer taps, but it was too small and the threads seemed *very* thin.
This is expected. 3D printed holes always end up smaller diameter than you design them to be, and the overhang that happens during printing when it's printing a thread will make this even worse.

Swing by Harbour Freight, grab a tap set and run it through the printed hole:


Then you should be good to go.
 
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Jehannum

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This is expected. 3D printed holes always end up smaller diameter than you design them to be, and the overhang that happens during printing when it's printing a thread will make this even worse.

Swing by Harbour Freight, grab a tap set and run it through the printed hole:


Then you should be good to go.
Just don't use those on metal.
 

Mr. Argumentor

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You can, but they didn't work for whatever reason. I used the standard thread for beer taps, but it was too small and the threads seemed *very* thin.
Communication issue here. Possible that the video was not the correct one, I scanned it without listening while eating lunch.

The hole tool gives threads when printing or machining or whatnot, but you can't specify them beyond normal threads.
The method that the video (i hope) showed was allowing full control of all of it. This should, theoretically, allow you to do a quick test print and rework it to fit properly
 

fly

Osharts 11
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Communication issue here. Possible that the video was not the correct one, I scanned it without listening while eating lunch.

The hole tool gives threads when printing or machining or whatnot, but you can't specify them beyond normal threads.
The method that the video (i hope) showed was allowing full control of all of it. This should, theoretically, allow you to do a quick test print and rework it to fit properly
Ahh, okay. I'll take a look later.
 

Mr. Argumentor

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Had a Thermal Runaway shutdown about 15-20 layers into my print last night. No damage to anything that I can see, nothing changed. Now I'm wondering if it is going to happen again and how I can prevent it.
 

gee

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Had a Thermal Runaway shutdown about 15-20 layers into my print last night. No damage to anything that I can see, nothing changed. Now I'm wondering if it is going to happen again and how I can prevent it.
Ohm out your heater cartridge, and check the terminal block on the board to make sure connections there are all good.

The only time I've had it happen was when a heater cartridge failed. Printer was commanding 100% duty cycle on the heater, temp was dropping out and that tripped the thermal protection in Marlin.

And if you have thermal protection enabled for the bed, check that wiring too.
 

Mr. Argumentor

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Can't find anything out of sorts. Printed a Benchy and it looks like I have some weird hangups with the lead screw about 1-1.25" up, but it printed beautifully.

Go to print the same file again and get a runaway error even earlier in the print. Gonna re-slice it and see if I can get it to do anything differently.
 

Mr. Argumentor

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Thermal runaway is when the heating element doesn't stop. Theoretically it can melt the aluminum of the print head, or set stuff on fire.
Marlin, and most modern systems, have a runaway protection circuit that cuts in and shuts it off if it starts to go nuts.
 
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Mr. Argumentor

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PID tuning helped. Didn't ultimately fix it, but I got through one more large print. Finally got a new thermistor and heating element in and she seems to be chooching along fairly well.


cNf7tTp.jpg
 
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Jehannum

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Dunno why I didn't just do the whole thing, but I bought a ball-socket cell phone mount with the intention of using it to hold the handheld ECU interface for the GTO. It's a piece of shit, but I'm saving the ball and socket joint and using that, plus some printed pieces to mount it to the transmission tunnel.

This one glues the flat end to the plastic holster for the handheld, the socket fits the back end of the ball and socket joint.
socket_mount.png
 
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gee

Blame It On The Gassa Nova
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I keep designing 3d printed test jigs at work using OpenSCAD, because our SolidWorks guy is too busy to do them.

Then they find their way into production and they want to build more and make changes and they're like "why did you make it in that crappy language nobody knows?"... "because the SolidWorks guy was too busy!"

And they then get angrily recreated in SolidWorks.