Thread English Health > US Health

my little brony

Keep Being A Little Bitch
Oct 15, 2004
34,952
18,763
823
I don't think you know jack shit about mental problems. :lol:

No, it's called science dear. Read some sometime, you might learn shit about mental issues. :lol:

I guarantee you I've forgotten more about mental issues than you've ever known.

Uh...do you think only people with low intellect take substances?

Of course not but only the weak ones allow it to ruin their lives and ability to function.
 

my little brony

Keep Being A Little Bitch
Oct 15, 2004
34,952
18,763
823
I would bitch that my government is more keen on doping people than actually addressing the problem. Mental health is incredibly important. Talk doesn't cost anything, and is frequently the absolute CURE (not treatment) for most mental health problems.

As for actual mentalists - drugs aren't the answer either. The only reason they're doped is to stop being a threat to others. You'll never get better out of that.

The great problem with mental healthcare is that the subject must agree that they are getting better before they can cease contact. That sounds completely okay, doesn't it?
Mental health is indeed very important though a therapists time isn't free.
 

Dory Berkowitz-Bukowski

Ready for some Heroin
Oct 15, 2004
40,831
5,893
723
Robin Hood Country
GAD was made up in the 1970's to sell SSRI's. It was directly corralated with a study nationwide in the US that suggested 60% of people had 'some sort of mental problem'. This could be ANYTHING. Insomnia, depression, stress.. Market gotta be tapped no?.

Propranolol has saw an increase in prescription recently due to its efficacy in getting over to sleep. I'm not so keen.

Propanolol as through my own experience and what my GP has told me (she's the only doctor I've met who actually explains drugs before prescribing or gives you a choice and talks it through - wtf??) it can work wonders in a select few people, is useless in quite a few but does the job reasonably in most people. I'd say it's pretty good as far as physical symptoms of anxiety go as in accordance with the blood thinning they do. Not so sure about sleep because some nights I have insomnia and others I'm fine. Not sure it helps with sleep much in myself tbh.

Apparently though (as per a rep meeting I was in t'other day) Gabapentin (or was it Pregabalin?) is now approved for generalised anxiety. Hmm.
 
Last edited:

polo

Flaccid Member
Aug 1, 2007
7,456
26
0
There seems to be a semantics problem here.

NHS treatment is 'free at source'

NHS dental work is not 'free at source' unless you have exemption.

In a nutshell. If a working man has a medical procedure there is no charge. If a working man has a dental procedure carried out by a dentist there is a sliding scale of charges which he will have to pay. That is a significant difference between the provision of dentistry and other medical provision under the NHS. The vast majority of NHS dental work is carried out at dentists surgeries and does not fall into that category of more serious work which is not chargeable. I had a root canal on Monday BTW. No anaesthesiologist there. Very few NHS dental surgeries can afford to have one on site.

Depends on the severity of the root canal and the patients requests. If a Dentist has the ability to put people under, of course they will. All they have to do is claim more on the form afterward.

Dentistry is subsidized. In all forms. There are purely NHS dentists in existence, though Scotland and Wales are way ahead of England on this due to own ability to set policy in healthcare. All Dental colleges which carry out the less run-of-the-mill work is all free at the point of care too. Last I checked braces are also free, noone takes the time to fill out the forms, or is even made aware of the forms existence. A nice NL hangover, just like Working Tax Credits.
 

OzSTEEZ

¡ɟɟo ʞɔnɟ ʇunɔ 'ᴉO
Nov 11, 2008
35,272
9,368
473
40
Oz
In what regard?

What can the doctor pass on to a third party? If I come into a GP with a bullet wound, I'd assume he'd be required to inform law enforcement. If I admit to him that I have a crack cociane addiction, i'd assume he'd be required to keep his trap shut. Well at least that's how I would hope it is. What is it really?
 
What can the doctor pass on to a third party? If I come into a GP with a bullet wound, I'd assume he'd be required to inform law enforcement. If I admit to him that I have a crack cociane addiction, i'd assume he'd be required to keep his trap shut. Well at least that's how I would hope it is. What is it really?

I'd want him to keep his trap shut about either scenario.
 

polo

Flaccid Member
Aug 1, 2007
7,456
26
0
What's the extent of the confidentiality laws between doctor and patient in the NHS?

All recorded internally at the practice for both medical history and posterity. Any outside requirement is dealt with on request and severity.

If the person or another persons life is in danger, the GP can make the relevant authorities aware.
 

Dory Berkowitz-Bukowski

Ready for some Heroin
Oct 15, 2004
40,831
5,893
723
Robin Hood Country
What can the doctor pass on to a third party? If I come into a GP with a bullet wound, I'd assume he'd be required to inform law enforcement. If I admit to him that I have a crack cociane addiction, i'd assume he'd be required to keep his trap shut. Well at least that's how I would hope it is. What is it really?
Sounds about just what you expect. I have no idea about shooting but I would expect an ER doctor to inform the police. As for drug taking behaviour that is under confidentiality.
 

polo

Flaccid Member
Aug 1, 2007
7,456
26
0
How many alcoholic beverages do you consume?

How often do you smoke?

Any illegal drug use?

How many guns are in your home?

Is anyone abusing you?

Do pictures of goats give your naughty bits a tingle?

This is why none of your friends come over to your house anymore.
 

dbzeag

Wants to kiss you where it stinks
Jun 9, 2006
16,993
452
298
42
This is why none of your friends come over to your house anymore.

I thought it was because no one knows the location of his secret bunker (aka house) after he buried it.
 

Sarcasmo

A Taste Of Honey Fluff Boy
Mar 28, 2005
34,395
461
648
43
Austin
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100201093039.htm

The UCSF team reviewed 43 published studies from 1984 to 2007. Authors of one-fourth of the studies had an affiliation with the tobacco industry.

The UCSF team determined that the average risk of a smoker developing Alzheimer's ("AD"), based on studies without tobacco industry affiliation, was estimated to be 1.72, meaning that smoking nearly doubled the risk of AD. In contrast, the team found that studies authored by individuals with tobacco industry affiliations, showed a risk factor of .86 (less than one), suggesting that smoking protects against AD. When all studies were considered together, the risk factor for developing AD from smoking was essentially neutral at a statistically insignificant 1.05.