Anyone well versed on digital logic?

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Grunt

Guest
You know I'm studying this kinda stuff..
But I didn't even understand the question :(
 

theacoustician

Flaccid Member
Sep 30, 2004
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Grunt said:
You know I'm studying this kinda stuff..
But I didn't even understand the question :(
Say I've got all kinds of gates and NANDs and ORs and shit. How do I know if its the most efficient circuit? Are there any rules for simplifying stuff down?
 
S

smileynev

Guest
The shortest distance between two points is a straight line.
 
S

smileynev

Guest
For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction
 
S

smileynev

Guest
An object at rest tends to stay at rest. An object in motion tends to stay in motion
 

Mean Mr. Mustard

Always shouts out something obscene
Sep 30, 2004
67,196
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Uranus
Steam
heyfubuddy
I have a buddy here at work thats a whiz with eletronic stuff like that, but hes away from his desk atm
Ill try him agian later or tomorrow if you still need help.
If he knows anything about it you can tag up with him via email
 

bast_imret

Erect Member
Oct 26, 2004
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The Karnaugh map comprises a box for every line in the truth table; the binary values above the boxes are those associated with the a and b inputs. Unlike a truth table, in which the input values typically follow a standard binary sequence (00, 01, 10, 11), the Karnaugh map's input values must be ordered such that the values for adjacent columns vary by only a single bit, for example, 00, 01, 11, and 10. This ordering is known as a gray code, and it is a key factor in the way in which Karnaugh maps work.
 

theacoustician

Flaccid Member
Sep 30, 2004
12,781
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bast_imret said:
The Karnaugh map comprises a box for every line in the truth table; the binary values above the boxes are those associated with the a and b inputs. Unlike a truth table, in which the input values typically follow a standard binary sequence (00, 01, 10, 11), the Karnaugh map's input values must be ordered such that the values for adjacent columns vary by only a single bit, for example, 00, 01, 11, and 10. This ordering is known as a gray code, and it is a key factor in the way in which Karnaugh maps work.
You're really good at googling. Thanks.
 
B

bungle

Guest
karnaugh map is right for simplifying logic actually, so long as its not too big . so if its smallish have a crack at it yourself and i'll break out the books to help if you want
 

Sp`ange

Flaccid Member
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