What is it with electric cars ...

theacoustician

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always being ugly as sin? I don't get it.

Anyway, I was looking at http://www.eliica.com/

Accelerates faster than a Porsche Turbo
Can go 200 miles on a 1 hour charge
Li-Ion batteries built into the frame
A motor for each of the 8 wheels!

Here's something else I thought... with the batteries positioned the way they are (watch the tech video), doesn't it essentially make this thing a giant battering ram? I wouldn't think that car would be very safe. It's also interesting to see the difference between the tech video and the real stills of the car.
 
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ieholly

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Pandora said:
It's a conspiricy by the gas companies so people won't stop buy gas powered vehicles....

:shifty:
even if that is true the production rate of oil peeks this decade so people should get used to ugly cars.
 

wr3kt

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ieholly said:
even if that is true the production rate of oil peeks this decade so people should get used to ugly cars.

Gah....don't want to get into that debate...
 
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ieholly

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wr3kt said:
Not really.
It's only true if the trend in EPA shitty guidelines continues.
yeah, no. look up deffeyes prediction. something similar was also used to predict domestic oil production decline very very accuratly (hubberts prediction 19856).

edit: yeah thats 1956. :)
 

Syrup Beaver

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ieholly said:
even if that is true the production rate of oil peeks this decade so people should get used to ugly cars.
Which could be easily solved by the EPA pulling the anti-diesel stick out of their ass and allowing all those wonderful normal looking diesel cars from Europe and Japan into the country.

We could all run biodiesel :drool: I plan to run my first tank of it this weekend
 

wr3kt

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ieholly said:
yeah, no. look up deffeyes prediction. something similar was also used to predict domestic oil production decline very very accuratly (hubberts prediction 19856).

edit: yeah thats 1956. :)
The only reason oil production would decline is because the EPA keeps US oil production ground to the ground.
The US cannot build any refineries within the US, we can't mine one of the largest oil fields discovered along Alaska, and we have yet to even tap into 90% of the fossil fuel that is still remaining.
The reason oil production is slowing is due to the US EPA and constrictions on importing oil. What is alos a problem is the amount of specialty blends that the US uses. It causes so many problems when refining crude because you have to completely rid a refinery of a one blend in order to refine another. I think there are about 30 specialty blends that are produced. And since there aren't enough refineries in the US to keep up with such a high number as well as high demand, we are forced to import which takes a toll on foreign oil.
We are also coming to the end of fatty crude which is the easiest to get to, but with restrictions on mining, it is difficult for oil companies to develope methods to mine for more difficult oil.
The EPA has the world in mind, as well as its safety, but it's causing more trouble than it's worth. In order for fuel to hold out long enough for alternative methods of power to catch up, they have to let up on refining restrictions.
 
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ieholly

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wr3kt said:
The only reason oil production would decline is because the EPA keeps US oil production ground to the ground.
The US cannot build any refineries within the US, we can't mine one of the largest oil fields discovered along Alaska, and we have yet to even tap into 90% of the fossil fuel that is still remaining.
The reason oil production is slowing is due to the US EPA and constrictions on importing oil. What is alos a problem is the amount of specialty blends that the US uses. It causes so many problems when refining crude because you have to completely rid a refinery of a one blend in order to refine another. I think there are about 30 specialty blends that are produced. And since there aren't enough refineries in the US to keep up with such a high number as well as high demand, we are forced to import which takes a toll on foreign oil.
We are also coming to the end of fatty crude which is the easiest to get to, but with restrictions on mining, it is difficult for oil companies to develope methods to mine for more difficult oil.
The EPA has the world in mind, as well as its safety, but it's causing more trouble than it's worth. In order for fuel to hold out long enough for alternative methods of power to catch up, they have to let up on refining restrictions.
no. i'm sorry you have a beef with the epa but oil production isn't unlimited. the mathmatical model that predicts the decline of production was created by an oil man and geologist. whether we "tap" alaska's oil doesn't matter. the rate at which new oil fields are found can simply not keep up with the quanity of oil taken out and that that is demanded. NOTHING we do initiate today (i.e getting rid of restrictions or drilling in alaska) can fix this.

this is a quote from his fabulous book:

"No initiative put in place starting today can have a substantial effect on the peak production year. No Caspian Sea exploration, no drilling in the South China Sea, no SUV replacements, no renewable energy projects can be brought on at a sufficient rate to avoid a bidding war for the remaining oil."

math doesn't lie.
 

theacoustician

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ieholly said:
no. i'm sorry you have a beef with the epa but oil production isn't unlimited. the mathmatical model that predicts the decline of production was created by an oil man and geologist. whether we "tap" alaska's oil doesn't matter. the rate at which new oil fields are found can simply not keep up with the quanity of oil taken out and that that is demanded. NOTHING we do initiate today (i.e getting rid of restrictions or drilling in alaska) can fix this.

this is a quote from his fabulous book:

"No initiative put in place starting today can have a substantial effect on the peak production year. No Caspian Sea exploration, no drilling in the South China Sea, no SUV replacements, no renewable energy projects can be brought on at a sufficient rate to avoid a bidding war for the remaining oil."

math doesn't lie.
One thing people don't think of ... we don't just use oil for fuels. Oil plays a big part in the manufacture of most plastics. I read something in my environmental engineering class that basically said that even if we stopped using oil for fuel today, we'd still run completely bone dry in less than 200 years.