The state of cars in this country

theacoustician

Flaccid Member
Sep 30, 2004
12,781
4
0
Marklar
0.00₥
Why are people saying the Middle East rather than Big Oil. They are the mud fuckers we really need to go after...
When I say the middle east, I mean the situation as a whole. The sooner we can leave the entire region and stop being dependent on them for energy, the better. That includes all players, governments and companies.
 

theacoustician

Flaccid Member
Sep 30, 2004
12,781
4
0
Marklar
0.00₥
Not drilling for our own oil. I don't know. :iono:
psst : demand, not just ours but India and China too.


We could drill all day long and twice on Sunday but we don't have enough oil to make a difference unless someone can figure out how to convert shale cheaply. Even if we drilled all of ANWR, it wouldn't fully come on line for 7-10 years and only drop gas by $0.04-0.06
 

Sarcasmo

A Taste Of Honey Fluff Boy
Mar 28, 2005
34,365
430
41
42
Austin
Marklar
663.49₥
Not drilling for our own oil. I don't know. :iono:
It really doesn't make a difference at this point where the oil comes from. What matters is the fact that we consume it, like everything else, at such a ridiculously bloated pace. I'm talking about Americans, but look to Asia as well.
 

Sarcasmo

A Taste Of Honey Fluff Boy
Mar 28, 2005
34,365
430
41
42
Austin
Marklar
663.49₥
Urban planning has a lot to do with it too. People have traditionally attempted to hold onto ancient population centers and expand them as that population requires. That may not be the best or most efficient way to go about it. What that has done is create the suburban balloon effect that requires people to move farther and farther away while still depending on the income those large cities provide.

By eliminating or modifying the central economic hub concept and spreading resources over a larger area you would effectively limit the need for longer commutes to and from work, creating a sort of gridwork of self contained, overlapping smaller towns. This, of course, would depend on large businesses incorporating more, smaller offices instead of the current tendency to have a primary complex. An investment to be sure, though we would likely see a significant improvement in our quality of life. An alternative would be gargantuan corporate complexes featuring both working and living/shopping areas.
 
Last edited:
Urban planning has a lot to do with it too. People have traditionally attempted to hold onto ancient population centers and expand them as that population requires. That may not be the best or most efficient way to go about it. What that has done is create the suburban balloon effect that requires people to move farther and farther away while still depending on the income those large cities provide.

By eliminating or modifying the central economic hub concept and spreading resources over a larger area you would effectively limit the need for longer commutes to and from work, creating a sort of gridwork of self contained, overlapping smaller towns. This, of course, would depend on large businesses incorporating more, smaller offices instead of the current tendency to have a primary complex. An investment to be sure, though we would likely see a significant improvement in our quality of life. An alternative would be gargantuan corporate complexes featuring both working and living/shopping areas.
Telecommuting solves a lot of that, too.

Aside from the physical work that must be done, many people don't actually NEED to be in the office to do their job.
 

theacoustician

Flaccid Member
Sep 30, 2004
12,781
4
0
Marklar
0.00₥
Urban planning has a lot to do with it too. People have traditionally attempted to hold onto ancient population centers and expand them as that population requires. That may not be the best or most efficient way to go about it. What that has done is create the suburban balloon effect that requires people to move farther and farther away while still depending on the income those large cities provide.

By eliminating or modifying the central economic hub concept and spreading resources over a larger area you would effectively limit the need for longer commutes to and from work, creating a sort of gridwork of self contained, overlapping smaller towns. This, of course, would depend on large businesses incorporating more, smaller offices instead of the current tendency to have a primary complex. An investment to be sure, though we would likely see a significant improvement in our quality of life. An alternative would be gargantuan corporate complexes featuring both working and living/shopping areas.
The only addresses one part of the problem, although better central planning certainly helps.
 

Gina

Flaccid Member
Sep 6, 2008
126
0
0
Houston
Marklar
0.00₥
Urban planning has a lot to do with it too. People have traditionally attempted to hold onto ancient population centers and expand them as that population requires. That may not be the best or most efficient way to go about it. What that has done is create the suburban balloon effect that requires people to move farther and farther away while still depending on the income those large cities provide.

By eliminating or modifying the central economic hub concept and spreading resources over a larger area you would effectively limit the need for longer commutes to and from work, creating a sort of gridwork of self contained, overlapping smaller towns. This, of course, would depend on large businesses incorporating more, smaller offices instead of the current tendency to have a primary complex. An investment to be sure, though we would likely see a significant improvement in our quality of life. An alternative would be gargantuan corporate complexes featuring both working and living/shopping areas.
You mean like an arcology?
 

water

Flaccid Member
Oct 29, 2004
15,608
67
0
39
AZ
Marklar
272.20₥
Telecommuting solves a lot of that, too.

Aside from the physical work that must be done, many people don't actually NEED to be in the office to do their job.
My boss is against any kind of telecommuting, which is asinine seeing as he is in IT and came out of telecomm.

We've asked a few times for the opportunity and he keeps turning us down.
 
My boss is against any kind of telecommuting, which is asinine seeing as he is in IT and came out of telecomm.

We've asked a few times for the opportunity and he keeps turning us down.
There's a lot of blatantly stupid managers such as that in IT.

Of course, then their response is "Well now how is that different from outsourcing it then?"