GAY RELUBRICANTS Where are you now? lulz

Coqui

Piccolo Pete
Oct 14, 2004
35,593
4,667
673
43
Columbus, OH
not finding your own solution is hardly denial.

You're going to have to explain that one. My option right now under my current insurance, is that I will have to make sure I can afford $50,000+ Just to give my son a sibling. Why? Because that coverage is currently denied for my wife due to a pre-existing condition.

That also is a routine procedure. So my solution is to either rob a bank, or deliver the kid myself putting both mother and child in more jeopardy.
 

Amstel

The Hoarse Whisperer
Jul 12, 2009
28,172
12,439
473
you're a whore, but in a good way. Kindof.
sounds like you have two solutions - but now I question your judgment.

3) don't stay with your current insurance.
4)
One of the most important protections under HIPAA is that it helps those with preexisting conditions get health coverage. In the past, some employers' group health plans limited, or even denied, coverage if a new employee had such a condition before enrolling in the plan. Under HIPAA, that is not allowed. If the plan generally provides coverage but denies benefits to you because you had a condition before your coverage began, then HIPAA applies.
Under HIPAA, a plan is allowed to look back only 6 months for a condition that was present before the start of coverage in a group health plan. Specifically, the law says that a preexisting condition exclusion can be imposed on a condition only if medical advice, diagnosis, care, or treatment was recommended or received during the 6 months prior to your enrollment date in the plan. As an example, you may have had arthritis for many years before you came to your current job. If you did not have medical advice, diagnosis, care, or treatment – recommended or received – in the 6 months before you enrolled in the plan, then the prior condition cannot be subject to a preexisting condition exclusion. If you did receive medical advice, diagnosis, care, or treatment within the past 6 months, then the plan may impose a preexisting condition exclusion for that condition (arthritis). In addition, HIPAA prohibits plans from applying a preexisting condition exclusion to pregnancy, genetic information, and certain children.
If you have a preexisting condition that can be excluded from your plan coverage, then there is a limit to the preexisting condition exclusion period that can be applied. HIPAA limits the preexisting condition exclusion period for most people to 12 months (18 months if you enroll late), although some plans may have a shorter time period or none at all. In addition, some people with a history of prior health coverage will be able to reduce the exclusion period even further using “creditable coverage.” Remember, a preexisting condition exclusion relates only to benefits for your (and your family’s) preexisting conditions. If you enroll, you will receive coverage for the plan’s other benefits during that time.
5)
Plenty of people with pre-existing conditions like Mr. Garner are struggling to find affordable insurance. These plans offer a real alternative, but consumers are only now becoming aware of them. Plus, there are some tough restrictions. Here is what you need to know:

FINDING A PLAN Pre-existing condition insurance plans, required by the new health care law, opened for business in July. The new plans come in two flavors: 27 states run their own plans with federal money, while the rest rely on the federal Department of Health and Human Services to administer the plans within their borders.

The new plans did not replace state high-risk pools, which have long offered insurance to people with pre-existing conditions. But the premiums in the new plans are generally much lower. That is why experts had worried that the new plans could be overwhelmed by a deluge of desperate applicants.

In fact, the P.C.I.P.’s got off to a slow start, and many consumers still have no idea they exist. In January, premiums in the federally run plans were reduced nearly 20 percent. Since then, enrollment in all of the new plans has increased 50 percent to 12,000 members.http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/19/health/19patient.html
 
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Sarcasmo

A Taste Of Honey Fluff Boy
Mar 28, 2005
34,395
461
648
43
Austin
ladies, don't ever forget, it's about the networking!

http://washingtonscene.thehill.com/...invites-lawmakers-on-a-boutique-shopping-trip

Amid shutdown drama, Rep. Brown invites lawmakers on a boutique shopping trip

April 6, 2011, 1:40 pm by Christina Wilkie

With a government shutdown looming, Capitol Hill was a pretty serious place on Wednesday afternoon.

But for Rep. Corrine Brown (D-Fla.), what better way to ease the tension than with a congressional ladies personal shopping trip in Arlington, Va.?

According to an email from Brown’s scheduler titled, “Outing with Congresswoman Corrine Brown,” staff member Cathy Gass invited Brown’s fellow female Congressional Black Caucus members to join the lawmaker at a boutique in Crystal City, Va. on Wednesday afternoon.

According to the email, which was addressed to “CBC Schedulers,” Brown “would like to invite the woman [sic] CBC Members to go shopping with her at Daniel’s Boutique this afternoon after votes.

Please let me know if your Member is interested and I will inform the Congresswoman.”

http://washingtonscene.thehill.com/images/stories/corrinebrown.jpg

Gass also suggests that for members who “would like to share [their] dress size, the boutique can pull some items for them to have available once they arrive.”

For those unfamiliar with the ultra high-end service, pulling clothes that a client might like before they arrive is better known as personal shopping.

According to the shop’s website, Daniel’s Boutique was founded in 1988 and “specializes in wardrobe consulting and custom tailoring.”

A visit to the boutique’s website revealed plenty of the skirt and jacket combinations popular with lawmakers.

A spokesman for Brown declined to comment on the shopping trip.​

Congress Members are the new Rockstars! :fly:

This doesn't bother me in the slightest. I don't care where they shop or how much money they have or spend. It's their right to pursue their own happiness.
 

JAXvillain

Curly_Sue
Oct 13, 2004
68,357
1,734
923
just a few years ago the GOP had the presidency, the house and the senate. where were all these cuts when they were in control? they're holding the country hostage to do everything possible to discredit the dems. they don't give a shit about the country
 

my little brony

Keep Being A Little Bitch
Oct 15, 2004
34,952
18,763
823
yeah but neither do the democrats

seriously, this wouldn't have been an issue had they passed a budget before the election. the democrats fucked us and the republicans are ensuring we continue to get fucked. they're both holding the country hostage
 

Amstel

The Hoarse Whisperer
Jul 12, 2009
28,172
12,439
473
you're a whore, but in a good way. Kindof.
guess who's paychecks don't stop during the shutdown. . . .

The White House has vowed to veto the short-term spending bill House Republicans will vote on this afternoon, taking away the safety net that could have given both sides another week to avert an immediate government shutdown.

Without a short-term extension, the options would be narrowed to either a broad successful deal or a shutdown as of midnight Friday.

“If presented with this bill, the president will veto it,” the White House said in an official statement of policy.

The House bill would extend the shutdown deadline by another week, to April 15, while funding defense needs for the rest of this year so that troops’ paychecks would not be endangered by a shutdown.​
 

my little brony

Keep Being A Little Bitch
Oct 15, 2004
34,952
18,763
823
217287_1755009393865_1197844178_31648637_7836664_n.jpg
 

Coqui

Piccolo Pete
Oct 14, 2004
35,593
4,667
673
43
Columbus, OH
sounds like you have two solutions - but now I question your judgment.

3) don't stay with your current insurance.
4)
One of the most important protections under HIPAA is that it helps those with preexisting conditions get health coverage. In the past, some employers' group health plans limited, or even denied, coverage if a new employee had such a condition before enrolling in the plan. Under HIPAA, that is not allowed. If the plan generally provides coverage but denies benefits to you because you had a condition before your coverage began, then HIPAA applies.
Under HIPAA, a plan is allowed to look back only 6 months for a condition that was present before the start of coverage in a group health plan. Specifically, the law says that a preexisting condition exclusion can be imposed on a condition only if medical advice, diagnosis, care, or treatment was recommended or received during the 6 months prior to your enrollment date in the plan. As an example, you may have had arthritis for many years before you came to your current job. If you did not have medical advice, diagnosis, care, or treatment – recommended or received – in the 6 months before you enrolled in the plan, then the prior condition cannot be subject to a preexisting condition exclusion. If you did receive medical advice, diagnosis, care, or treatment within the past 6 months, then the plan may impose a preexisting condition exclusion for that condition (arthritis). In addition, HIPAA prohibits plans from applying a preexisting condition exclusion to pregnancy, genetic information, and certain children.
If you have a preexisting condition that can be excluded from your plan coverage, then there is a limit to the preexisting condition exclusion period that can be applied. HIPAA limits the preexisting condition exclusion period for most people to 12 months (18 months if you enroll late), although some plans may have a shorter time period or none at all. In addition, some people with a history of prior health coverage will be able to reduce the exclusion period even further using “creditable coverage.” Remember, a preexisting condition exclusion relates only to benefits for your (and your family’s) preexisting conditions. If you enroll, you will receive coverage for the plan’s other benefits during that time.
5)
Plenty of people with pre-existing conditions like Mr. Garner are struggling to find affordable insurance. These plans offer a real alternative, but consumers are only now becoming aware of them. Plus, there are some tough restrictions. Here is what you need to know:

FINDING A PLAN Pre-existing condition insurance plans, required by the new health care law, opened for business in July. The new plans come in two flavors: 27 states run their own plans with federal money, while the rest rely on the federal Department of Health and Human Services to administer the plans within their borders.

The new plans did not replace state high-risk pools, which have long offered insurance to people with pre-existing conditions. But the premiums in the new plans are generally much lower. That is why experts had worried that the new plans could be overwhelmed by a deluge of desperate applicants.

In fact, the P.C.I.P.’s got off to a slow start, and many consumers still have no idea they exist. In January, premiums in the federally run plans were reduced nearly 20 percent. Since then, enrollment in all of the new plans has increased 50 percent to 12,000 members.http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/19/health/19patient.html

I am always looking for #3. But not having much luck finding something suitable.
I didn't know about #4
Regarding #5, I don't find out if it's classified as a pre-existing condition anyways, until they tell me. (they won't cover labor if she experiences any type of pre-eclampsya - which is moot according to point #4 anyways)
 

Amstel

The Hoarse Whisperer
Jul 12, 2009
28,172
12,439
473
you're a whore, but in a good way. Kindof.
While some members of Congress are coming out to say that they don’t want to be paid during a government shutdown or would donate their pay to charity, Rep. Linda Sanchez (D-Calif.) says she’s not willing to forgo her salary.

“I have to tell you, I live paycheck to paycheck, like most Americans,” she said Thursday afternoon on MSNBC. “It's very difficult for me to say, ‘Hey, I can give up my paycheck,’ because the reality is, I have financial obligations that I have to meet on a month-to-month basis that doesn't make it possible for me.”

Sanchez, ranking member on the House Ethics Committee, said she has student loans, a 2-year-old son, and homes in her district and in Washington – expenses that mean she needs every paycheck she gets. House members’ 2011 salary is $174,000.​

together everyone. . . awwwwwwwwwww.
 
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OzSTEEZ

¡ɟɟo ʞɔnɟ ʇunɔ 'ᴉO
Nov 11, 2008
35,272
9,368
473
40
Oz
WTF is this shit?!

http://thestir.cafemom.com/big_kid/118592/cops_writing_tickets_to_6yearolds

They're charging kids as young as 6 with fine-carrying offenses, just so they can collect revenue. According to Texas Appleseed, a "nonprofit research and advocacy group focusing on social and economic justice," kids are being handed tickets for crimes like "classroom disruption," then forced to pay fines of as much as $500 for the in-school offense. The courts, naturally, get to keep all the money.

:waw:
 

water

Flaccid Member
Oct 29, 2004
15,608
67
0
41
AZ
just a few years ago the GOP had the presidency, the house and the senate. where were all these cuts when they were in control? they're holding the country hostage to do everything possible to discredit the dems. they don't give a shit about the country

lol @ you still having this misguided dogmatic view of the situation. Neither side gives a shit, man. It's all about getting re-elected, that's all a politician cares about.
 

OzSTEEZ

¡ɟɟo ʞɔnɟ ʇunɔ 'ᴉO
Nov 11, 2008
35,272
9,368
473
40
Oz
While some members of Congress are coming out to say that they don’t want to be paid during a government shutdown or would donate their pay to charity, Rep. Linda Sanchez (D-Calif.) says she’s not willing to forgo her salary.

“I have to tell you, I live paycheck to paycheck, like most Americans,” she said Thursday afternoon on MSNBC. “It's very difficult for me to say, ‘Hey, I can give up my paycheck,’ because the reality is, I have financial obligations that I have to meet on a month-to-month basis that doesn't make it possible for me.”

Sanchez, ranking member on the House Ethics Committee, said she has student loans, a 2-year-old son, and homes in her district and in Washington – expenses that mean she needs every paycheck she gets. House members’ 2011 salary is $174,000.​

together everyone. . . awwwwwwwwwww.

Sounds just like the Republican Rep who whined about his $174K salary. But in this instance, she's just saying she has got bills to pay.