Ontopic Please proof-read this:

Mr. Argumentor

Will Argue for Tacos
Sep 27, 2012
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Got a couple little papers I'd like to get looked over, make sure I haven't made any huge fuckups.
Check it out, don't check it out, whatevers.

Flannery O'Connor's A Good Man Is hard ToFind, like many of her stories,is about searching for the hint of a divine spark in all humans. Itis a story about trying find that hint of divine grace in all humanbeings.Flannerystarts of her story with a grandmother that does not seem to care forher child, or her grandchildren other than how they might payattention to her, she cares for her daughter in law so little thatshe does not even care to mention her name. The grandmother wantsnothing more than to get her way in every conceivable facet of life. Despite this at the end of the story, when everything she loves isviolently taken away from her, she sees the man who slew everyone inher life in a beautiful light. She reaches out to this man who isthe epitome of evil and tries to envelope him in love in what mightonly be seen as divine grace.
Many who readthis story do not see this dramatic change as a divine revelation butinstead as another selfish attempt by this lady to survive, to gether way, when no one else in her family did. Yet, if you read thisstory carefully you will notice that this lady has never been for alack of words. In a vain attempt to get what she wants, she waxeseloquently upon the evils of The Misfit and why the family shouldforsake the path to Florida. She natters on incessantly to thefamily about what they are passing, she babbles to the babe about thesights and scenery that they pass on their drive, despite the factthat not one person is paying attention to her she talks. And shetalks. And she talks. For her to be struck dumb is in itself a breakfrom her character, then for her to be concerned with this man'ssoul, for her to believe that he is one of her flesh and blood and toreach out to him tenderly is such a break that one of the onlyexplanations left to us is divine inspiration. The Misfit's reactionin itself could be confirmation of this. Going by what we know ofThe Misfit and of what he has done, why would anyone in thatsituation ever try to communicate with him that way? So The Misfitrecoils, shocked, and ends her life.
FlanneryO'Connor herself was [FONT=Times New Roman, serif]deeplyreligious, as a result of this the majority of her stories seem toask us if there is a divine streak within us. In order to get us toask this question her stories are typically extremely dark, not boundby any normal sentiments, and plainly realistic. As Flannery herselfsays in one of her letters “[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Thestories are hard but they are hard because there is nothing harder orless sentimental than Christian realism.” She could have easilytold a story where The Misfit realized his mistake and was redeemedby his faith and belief in Jesus meeting her divine inspiration, butthat story would not have introduced any hard questions for thereader to pursue and think about. A happy ending makes the readerfeel good, but too often it is unrealistic.[/FONT]
 

Mr. Argumentor

Will Argue for Tacos
Sep 27, 2012
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Mother fuck
Why the hell does copying and pasting something here fuck up so much?
Look at that mass of shit, random spaces deleted, randomly changing fonts/switching to italics, what the hell?


Let's see if this shit works
Flannery O'Connor's A Good Man Is hard To Find,like many of her stories, is about searching for the hint of a divinespark in all humans. It is a story about trying find that hint ofdivine grace in all human beings.Flannery starts of her story with a grandmother that does not seem tocare for her child, or her grandchildren other than how they mightpay attention to her, she cares for her daughter in law so littlethat she does not even care to mention her name. The grandmotherwants nothing more than to get her way in every conceivable facet oflife. Despite this at the end of the story, when everything sheloves is violently taken away from her, she sees the man who sleweveryone in her life in a beautiful light. She reaches out to thisman who is the epitome of evil and tries to envelope him in love inwhat might only be seen as divine grace.
Many who read this story do not see this dramatic change as a divinerevelation but instead as another selfish attempt by this lady tosurvive, to get her way, when no one else in her family did. Yet, ifyou read this story carefully you will notice that this lady hasnever been for a lack of words. In a vain attempt to get what shewants, she waxes eloquently upon the evils of The Misfit and why thefamily should forsake the path to Florida. She natters onincessantly to the family about what they are passing, she babbles tothe babe about the sights and scenery that they pass on their drive,despite the fact that not one person is paying attention to her shetalks. And she talks. And she talks. For her to be struck dumb is initself a break from her character, then for her to be concerned withthis man's soul, for her to believe that he is one of her flesh andblood and to reach out to him tenderly is such a break that one ofthe only explanations left to us is divine inspiration. The Misfit'sreaction in itself could be confirmation of this. Going by what weknow of The Misfit and of what he has done, why would anyone in thatsituation ever try to communicate with him that way? So The Misfitrecoils, shocked, and ends her life.
Flannery O'Connor herself was deeplyreligious, as a result of this the majority of her stories seem toask us if there is a divine streak within us. In order to get us toask this question her stories are typically extremely dark, not boundby any normal sentiments, and plainly realistic. As Flannery herselfsays in one of her letters “Thestories are hard but they are hard because there is nothing harder orless sentimental than Christian realism.” She could have easilytold a story where The Misfit realized his mistake and was redeemedby his faith and belief in Jesus meeting her divine inspiration, butthat story would not have introduced any hard questions for thereader to pursue and think about. A happy ending makes the readerfeel good, but too often it is unrealistic.


Nope, not even after hitting the remove formatting button it fucks up
Fly, fix your shit
 

Mr. Argumentor

Will Argue for Tacos
Sep 27, 2012
49,956
22,593
473
Tampa-ish
Steam
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Code:
Code:
[SIZE=3][FONT=arial] Flannery O'Connor's [I]A Good Man Is hard To Find[/I],like many of her stories, is about searching for the hint of a divinespark in all humans.  It is a story about trying find that hint ofdivine grace in all human beings.[/FONT][/SIZE]
[SIZE=3][FONT=arial][/FONT][/SIZE][SIZE=3][FONT=arial]Flannery starts of her story with a grandmother that does not seem tocare for her child, or her grandchildren other than how they mightpay attention to her, she cares for her daughter in law so littlethat she does not even care to mention her name.  The grandmotherwants nothing more than to get her way in every conceivable facet oflife.  Despite this at the end of the story, when everything sheloves is violently taken away from her, she sees the man who sleweveryone in her life in a beautiful light.  She reaches out to thisman who is the epitome of evil and tries to envelope him in love inwhat might only be seen as divine grace. [/FONT][/SIZE]
[SIZE=3][FONT=arial][/FONT][/SIZE][SIZE=3][FONT=arial]Many who read this story do not see this dramatic change as a divinerevelation but instead as another selfish attempt by this lady tosurvive, to get her way, when no one else in her family did.  Yet, ifyou read this story carefully you will notice that this lady hasnever been for a lack of words.  In a vain attempt to get what shewants, she waxes eloquently upon the evils of The Misfit and why thefamily should forsake the path to Florida.  She natters onincessantly to the family about what they are passing, she babbles tothe babe about the sights and scenery that they pass on their drive,despite the fact that not one person is paying attention to her shetalks. And she talks. And she talks.  For her to be struck dumb is initself a break from her character, then for her to be concerned withthis man's soul, for her to believe that he is one of her flesh andblood and to reach out to him tenderly is such a break that one ofthe only explanations left to us is divine inspiration.  The Misfit'sreaction in itself could be confirmation of this.  Going by what weknow of The Misfit and of what he has done, why would anyone in thatsituation ever try to communicate with him that way?  So The Misfitrecoils, shocked, and ends her life.[/FONT][/SIZE]
[SIZE=3][FONT=arial][/FONT][/SIZE][SIZE=3][FONT=arial]Flannery O'Connor herself was deeplyreligious, as a result of this the majority of her stories seem toask us if there is a divine streak within us.  In order to get us toask this question her stories are typically extremely dark, not boundby any normal sentiments, and plainly realistic.  As Flannery herselfsays in one of her letters “Thestories are hard but they are hard because there is nothing harder orless sentimental than Christian realism.”  She could have easilytold a story where The Misfit realized his mistake and was redeemedby his faith and belief in Jesus meeting her divine inspiration, butthat story would not have introduced any hard questions for thereader to pursue and think about.  A happy ending makes the readerfeel good, but too often it is unrealistic.[/FONT][/SIZE]
 

Mr. Argumentor

Will Argue for Tacos
Sep 27, 2012
49,956
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Tampa-ish
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Flannery starts of her story

:wtf:
Thanks
Code:
Code:
[SIZE=3][FONT=arial] Flannery O'Connor's [I]A Good Man Is hard To Find[/I],like many of her stories, is about searching for the hint of a divinespark in all humans.  It is a story about trying find that hint ofdivine grace in all human beings.[/FONT][/SIZE]
[SIZE=3][FONT=arial]Flannery starts of her story with a grandmother that does not seem tocare for her child, or her grandchildren other than how they mightpay attention to her, she cares for her daughter in law so littlethat she does not even care to mention her name.  The grandmotherwants nothing more than to get her way in every conceivable facet oflife.  Despite this at the end of the story, when everything sheloves is violently taken away from her, she sees the man who sleweveryone in her life in a beautiful light.  She reaches out to thisman who is the epitome of evil and tries to envelope him in love inwhat might only be seen as divine grace. [/FONT][/SIZE]
[SIZE=3][FONT=arial]Many who read this story do not see this dramatic change as a divinerevelation but instead as another selfish attempt by this lady tosurvive, to get her way, when no one else in her family did.  Yet, ifyou read this story carefully you will notice that this lady hasnever been for a lack of words.  In a vain attempt to get what shewants, she waxes eloquently upon the evils of The Misfit and why thefamily should forsake the path to Florida.  She natters onincessantly to the family about what they are passing, she babbles tothe babe about the sights and scenery that they pass on their drive,despite the fact that not one person is paying attention to her shetalks. And she talks. And she talks.  For her to be struck dumb is initself a break from her character, then for her to be concerned withthis man's soul, for her to believe that he is one of her flesh andblood and to reach out to him tenderly is such a break that one ofthe only explanations left to us is divine inspiration.  The Misfit'sreaction in itself could be confirmation of this.  Going by what weknow of The Misfit and of what he has done, why would anyone in thatsituation ever try to communicate with him that way?  So The Misfitrecoils, shocked, and ends her life.[/FONT][/SIZE]
[SIZE=3][FONT=arial]Flannery O'Connor herself was deeplyreligious, as a result of this the majority of her stories seem toask us if there is a divine streak within us.  In order to get us toask this question her stories are typically extremely dark, not boundby any normal sentiments, and plainly realistic.  As Flannery herselfsays in one of her letters “Thestories are hard but they are hard because there is nothing harder orless sentimental than Christian realism.”  She could have easilytold a story where The Misfit realized his mistake and was redeemedby his faith and belief in Jesus meeting her divine inspiration, butthat story would not have introduced any hard questions for thereader to pursue and think about.  A happy ending makes the readerfeel good, but too often it is unrealistic.[/FONT][/SIZE]
MOTHER FUCKING FUCK YOUR FUCKING FUCKLESS FUCK!
 

Coqui

Piccolo Pete
Oct 14, 2004
35,593
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673
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Columbus, OH
While you may be using big words, the way you put this together is very elementary. The flow is very, "child-like"
 

Mr. Argumentor

Will Argue for Tacos
Sep 27, 2012
49,956
22,593
473
Tampa-ish
Steam
asastang
Why don't you just post it as is instead of in quotes?
I did that with my Mustang thread, saw the same issues, but I'll try here.

Flannery O'Connor's A Good Man Is hard To Find, like many of her stories, is about searching for the hint of a divine spark in all humans. It is a story about trying find that hint of divine grace in all human beings.
Flannery starts of her story with a grandmother that does not seem to care for her child, or her grandchildren other than how they might pay attention to her, she cares for her daughter in law so little that she does not even care to mention her name. The grandmother wants nothing more than to get her way in every conceivable facet of life. Despite this at the end of the story, when everything she loves is violently taken away from her, she sees the man who slew everyone in her life in a beautiful light. She reaches out to this man who is the epitome of evil and tries to envelope him in love in what might only be seen as divine grace.
Many who read this story do not see this dramatic change as a divine revelation but instead as another selfish attempt by this lady to survive, to get her way, when no one else in her family did. Yet, if you read this story carefully you will notice that this lady has never been for a lack of words. In a vain attempt to get what she wants, she waxes eloquently upon the evils of The Misfit and why the family should forsake the path to Florida. She natters on incessantly to the family about what they are passing, she babbles to the babe about the sights and scenery that they pass on their drive, despite the fact that not one person is paying attention to her she talks. And she talks. And she talks. For her to be struck dumb is in itself a break from her character, then for her to be concerned with this man's soul, for her to believe that he is one of her flesh and blood and to reach out to him tenderly is such a break that one of the only explanations left to us is divine inspiration. The Misfit's reaction in itself could be confirmation of this. Going by what we know of The Misfit and of what he has done, why would anyone in that situation ever try to communicate with him that way? So The Misfit recoils, shocked, and ends her life.
Flannery O'Connor herself was deeply religious, as a result of this the majority of her stories seem to ask us if there is a divine streak within us. In order to get us to ask this question her stories are typically extremely dark, not bound by any normal sentiments, and plainly realistic. As Flannery herself says in one of her letters “The stories are hard but they are hard because there is nothing harder or less sentimental than Christian realism.” She could have easily told a story where The Misfit realized his mistake and was redeemed by his faith and belief in Jesus meeting her divine inspiration, but that story would not have introduced any hard questions for the reader to pursue and think about. A happy ending makes the reader feel good, but too often it is unrealistic.
 

Dory Berkowitz-Bukowski

Ready for some Heroin
Oct 15, 2004
41,040
6,081
723
Robin Hood Country
Got a couple little papers I'd like to get looked over, make sure I haven't made any huge fuckups.
Check it out, don't check it out, whatevers.

Flannery O'Connor's A Good Man Is hard(needs capital and italics) To Find, like many of her stories, is about searching for the hint of a divine spark in all humans. It is a story about trying find that hint of divine grace in all human beings. (repetition of divine, please find other word in thesaurus)
Flannery starts of (should be off) her story with a grandmother that does not seem to care for her child, or her grandchildren other than how they might pay attention to her, she cares for her daughter in law so little that she does not even care to mention her name. The grandmother wants nothing more than to get her way in every conceivable facet of life. Despite this at the end of the story, when everything she loves is violently taken away from her, she sees the man who slew everyone in her life in a beautiful light. She reaches out to this man who is the epitome of evil and tries to envelope him in love in what might only be seen as divine grace.(divine, do you want to use this word again)
Many who read this story do not see this dramatic change as a divine revelation but instead as another selfish attempt by this lady to survive (do you want to put 'this lady?' seems too informal), to get her way, when no one else in her family did. (when no one else in her family did is informal, do you want to change?) Yet, if you read this story carefully you will notice that this lady (this lady again?) has never been for a lack of words. In a vain attempt to get what she wants, she waxes eloquently upon the evils of The Misfit and why the family should forsake the path to Florida. She natters (is natters too informal?) on incessantly to the family about what they are passing, she babbles to the babe about the sights and scenery that they pass on their drive, despite the fact that not one person is paying attention to her (as?) she talks. And she talks. And she talks. For her to be struck dumb is in itself a break from her character, then for her to be concerned with this man's soul, for her to believe that he is one of her flesh and blood and to reach out to him tenderly is such a break that one of the only explanations left to us is divine inspiration. The Misfit's reaction in itself could be confirmation of this. Going by what we know of The Misfit and of what he has done, why would anyone in that situation ever try to communicate with him that way? So The Misfit recoils, shocked, and ends her life.
Flannery O'Connor herself was deeply religious, as a result of this the majority of her stories seem to ask us if there is a divine streak within us (do they seem to ask or DO they ask? Does your college like you to be vague or to make assertions yourself?). In order to get us to ask this question her stories are typically extremely dark, not bound by any normal sentiments, and plainly realistic. As Flannery herself says in one of her letters “The stories are hard but they are hard because there is nothing harder or less sentimental than Christian realism.” She could have easily told a story where The Misfit realized his mistake and was redeemed by his faith and belief in Jesus meeting her divine inspiration, but that story would not have introduced any hard questions for the reader to pursue and think about. A happy ending makes the reader feel good, but too often it is unrealistic.


I've put any things that strike me in brackets, feel free to ignore. I have no idea if this is for academic reasons so my criticism may be mostly useless if not.
 

Mr. Argumentor

Will Argue for Tacos
Sep 27, 2012
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ifeellikeishouldtypelikethisnowbb...
No thanks.


Coqui - I've seen some decent evidence that this teacher doesn't read anything turned in except the minimum required to make sure that no one is copying each other. Just want to make sure there are no obvious fuckups in case she decides to read one or two.
 

Coqui

Piccolo Pete
Oct 14, 2004
35,593
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Columbus, OH

It's been a while since I've written a book report, but your paragraphing is very jumbled. The first paragraph kind of says you're going to talk about what you read (personal interpretation) in the story, but then you immediatly just rehash the story itself.

Things like this.