ITT, post your theories why the forum was down

Pandora

Flaccid Member
Oct 19, 2004
7,656
0
0
Atlanta GA!
skewed.textamerica.com
Marklar
₥0
Drool-Boy said:
He laughs, it just has to be an A/V joke or something about poop.

Or monkeys.


97543552_m.gif
 

Galen

Flaccid Member
Nov 25, 2004
3,354
0
0
Ireland
Marklar
₥0
fly said:
"Why are the lights out on this runway?"

FUCKING IDIOTS
Kentucky air traffic controllers training is questionable.

Either that or they were Air Force trained. Talk about ego over skills. "Yeah, I controlled 50sq miles of air space and 2 aircraft last week". Yeah, nice work Chad. Keep reaching for that GED.
 

fly

omg
Oct 1, 2004
75,867
25,937
1,323
Marklar
₥62,053
Steam
mattressfish
Galen said:
Kentucky air traffic controllers training is questionable.

Either that or they were Air Force trained. Talk about ego over skills. "Yeah, I controlled 50sq miles of air space and 2 aircraft last week". Yeah, nice work Chad. Keep reaching for that GED.
It was apparently pilot error last I heard, they were cleared for the main runway. THE ONE WITH LIGHTS ON. :tard:
 

Galen

Flaccid Member
Nov 25, 2004
3,354
0
0
Ireland
Marklar
₥0
fly said:
It was apparently pilot error last I heard, they were cleared for the main runway. THE ONE WITH LIGHTS ON. :tard:
All reports over here are that they were told to taxi and depart on the shorter runway. If the pilots had never flown there before, it's not their fault. I doubt V1 was achieved by the length of the strip, but once it's moving there's no way to stop it quick enough.

Also, if the pilots had disobeyed an order (to Taxi and depart the main runway), and they didn't do this they would have been warned immediately. They have to ask for clearence to depart, after all.
 

fly

omg
Oct 1, 2004
75,867
25,937
1,323
Marklar
₥62,053
Steam
mattressfish
Galen said:
All reports over here are that they were told to taxi and depart on the shorter runway. If the pilots had never flown there before, it's not their fault. I doubt V1 was achieved by the length of the strip, but once it's moving there's no way to stop it quick enough.

Also, if the pilots had disobeyed an order (to Taxi and depart the main runway), and they didn't do this they would have been warned immediately. They have to ask for clearence to depart, after all.

Is there a newer report than this?

http://today.reuters.com/news/artic...N28212666_RTRIDST_0_CRASH-COMAIR-UPDATE-4.XML

UPDATE 4-Pilot of Ky. plane crash may have been confused
Tue Aug 29, 2006 1:10 AM ET

(Recasts with crash investigator's comments)

By Steve Robrahn

LEXINGTON, Ky., Aug 28 (Reuters) - The co-pilot who was at the controls of the Comair commuter jet that crashed off the wrong runway and killed 49 people may have been confused by changes in the airport's runway lights, aviation experts said on Monday.

On Sunday's ill-fated predawn takeoff, the co-pilot, the flight's lone survivor, may not have been aware the lights on the proper runway were back on after they had been at least partially out when he landed at the airport two nights earlier.

A temporary advisory to pilots warning of the lighting outages on the longer runway used by commercial flights at Lexington's Blue Grass Airport had expired the day before the crash, the aviation sources said.

A witness to the accident, a ramp employee of another airline, told investigators the 3,500-foot (1-km) Runway 26 used by the jet was dark, while the lights were lit alongside the 7,000-foot-long (2-km) intersecting Runway 22 used by commercial air traffic at Lexington's Blue Grass Airport.

"This individual witnessed the taxi, the takeoff roll, and the accident. He told our investigators that Runway 26 was not lit and that Runway 22 and the taxiways were lit," National Transportation Safety Board investigator Debbie Hersman told a news briefing.

The lone air traffic controller on duty had cleared the airliner to take off on the longer runway and had no further communication with the pilots as they hurtled down the wrong strip, she said.

In a conversation recorded on the plane's cockpit voice recorder, the pilots noted the darkened runway. As the plane attained speed, the pilot called for the nose to come up so the front wheels would leave the pavement, Hersman said.

Tire markings showed the plane did not become airborne until striking a berm beyond the end of the runway. The plane then hit a perimeter fence, cleared a barbed-wire fence, struck some trees, and then came to rest in a field and burst into flames.

PILOT NOT INTERVIEWED

Co-pilot James Polehinke was pulled from the flaming wreckage, and remained in critical condition. Investigators have yet to interview him.

The NTSB has not been fully satisfied with efforts to reduce runway incidents. Even at heavily monitored airports, planes sometimes wind up on the wrong runway or taxiway.

"It's a major concern," said Carol Carmody, a former NTSB vice chairman.

At the airport, investigators drove stakes into the ground at the end of the runway and on the rolling hillsides beyond, where tarps protected wreckage from a steady rain. Red directional signs clearly marked the two runways.

"One of the issues that we're certainly going to be looking at is the visibility and the ability for the crew to see," Hersman said. "And also the issue of whether or not air traffic control could see."

Investigators used a borrowed plane, a 50-seat CRJ-100 made by Montreal-based Bombardier Inc. <BBDb.TO>, and a tall truck to simulate what the pilots might have seen.

"There are often issues that present themselves, whether weather or darkness or other things that could have obscured the view," she said.

The local coroner said the bodies had been removed from the burned-out fuselage and bodily fluids taken to perform toxicology tests.

"Toxicology reports are standard in accident investigations," Hersman said. "They generally look for alcohol and six illicit drugs."

Comair is a feeder carrier for Delta Air Lines <DALRQ.PK>. Both are restructuring in bankruptcy. (Additional reporting by John Crawley in Washington)