Flytrap #2 - Possible NSFW Content and WAW fail , Whiskey Bacon and tamale hootch

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dbzeag

Wants to kiss you where it stinks
Jun 9, 2006
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High diving?


Honestly?


You are just fucking with me now...

No I am not. Greg Louganis refused treatment at the pool because he was poz when he hit his head on the board. He waited until the hospital before he told anyone or got medical coverage. His coach knew and it was his coach that padded his head with towels to get him to the hospital.
 

dbzeag

Wants to kiss you where it stinks
Jun 9, 2006
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I feel bad for anyone who has contracted HIV through means they couldn't control. I cannot say the same for anyone who knowingly puts themselves into risky situations knowing the consequences. Doing this and then hiding behind a protection blanket of discrimination is bullshit and weak.

Kind of related but totally curious, how many of you guys have had ANY bareback sex before? What is the percentage of sex you have had (or currently have) that's sans condoms?
 

Floptical

Doesnt Read Thread Titles
Sep 1, 2006
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No I am not. Greg Louganis refused treatment at the pool because he was poz when he hit his head on the board. He waited until the hospital before he told anyone or got medical coverage. His coach knew and it was his coach that padded his head with towels to get him to the hospital.

That was also in 1988. We did not even have close to the amount of knowledge of that disease and what it could do then.
 

dbzeag

Wants to kiss you where it stinks
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That was also in 1988. We did not even have close to the amount of knowledge of that disease and what it could do then.

so? If porksoda's worry is if there is a threat of blood contact or spreading blood then that should be prohibited to poz people. I would think almost ANY sporting event is right up there, apart from bowling and chess.
 

zengirl

If I had a dollar might give ya 99
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Sarcasmo

A Taste Of Honey Fluff Boy
Mar 28, 2005
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Austin
Duke, please correct your friend. That comment is making my eye twitch and you aren't doing her a favor by not pointing out why she's retarded.
 

Floptical

Doesnt Read Thread Titles
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so? If porksoda's worry is if there is a threat of blood contact or spreading blood then that should be prohibited to poz people. I would think almost ANY sporting event is right up there, apart from bowling and chess.

I don't know if any other contact sports outside of Boxing have been put in that situation yet. I know Boxing/MMA and Athletic Commissions have said no.
 

JAXvillain

Curly_Sue
Oct 13, 2004
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Just look at the Tommy Morrison situation. He came out as positive and wasn't allowed to box anymore. Because his job had a risk of spreading the infection he had no ground against the state medical boards or athletic commissions.

wow, I never knew that's what happened to him.
 

Floptical

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according to this link http://www.globalhealthfacts.org/data/topic/map.aspx?ind=7 17k folks died from AIDS in the US in 2009

but according to this article http://articles.cnn.com/2009-04-28/...ths-swine-flu-flu-related-deaths?_s=PM:HEALTH

the REGULAR flu kills roughly 36k per year

How do the new estimates compare with the 36,000 figure that is often cited as an estimate of annual flu-associated deaths?

The 36,000 estimate was presented in a 2003 study by CDC scientists published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)External Web Site Icon, using similar statistical modeling techniques, but only refers to a period from 1990-91 through 1998-99. During those years, the number of estimated deaths ranged from 17,000 to 52,000, with an average of about 36,000. The JAMA study also looked at seasonal influenza-associated deaths over a 23 year period, from 1976-1977 and 1998-1999. During that period, estimates of respiratory and circulatory influenza-associated deaths ranged from about 5,000 to about 52,000, with an average of about 25,000. While the 36,000 number is often cited, it's important to note that during that decade, influenza A (H3N2) was the predominant virus during most of the seasons, and H3N2 influenza viruses are typically associated with higher death rates. CDC believes that the range of deaths over the past 31 years (~3,000 to ~49,000) is a more accurate representation of the unpredictability and variability of flu-associated deaths

CDC does not know exactly how many people die from seasonal flu each year. There are several reasons for this. First, states are not required to report individual seasonal flu cases or deaths of people older than 18 years of age to CDC. Second, seasonal influenza is infrequently listed on death certificates of people who die from flu-related complications. Third, many seasonal flu-related deaths occur one or two weeks after a person’s initial infection, either because the person may develop a secondary bacterial co-infection (such as bacterial pneumonia) or because seasonal influenza can aggravate an existing chronic illness (such as congestive heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Also, most people who die from seasonal flu-related complications are not tested for flu, or they seek medical care later in their illness when seasonal influenza can no longer be detected from respiratory samples. Sensitive influenza tests are only likely to detect influenza if performed within a week after onset of illness. In addition, some commonly used tests to diagnose influenza in clinical settings are not highly sensitive and can provide false negative results (i.e. the misdiagnose flu illness as not being flu.) For these reasons, many flu-related deaths may not be recorded on death certificates. These are some of the reasons that CDC and other public health agencies in the United States and other countries use statistical models to estimate the annual number of seasonal flu-related deaths. (Flu deaths in children were made a nationally notifiable condition in 2004, and since then, states have been required to report flu-related child deaths in the United States through the Influenza Associated Pediatric Mortality Surveillance System).

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/us_flu-related_deaths.htm
 

dbzeag

Wants to kiss you where it stinks
Jun 9, 2006
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pork, where do you draw the line between poz people who you would be around and who you don't want to be near? What scenario? Anything to do with treatment of physical ailments like a doctor, I would assume. And anything that has a possibility of causing an open wound, like a paper cut a secretary might encounter or scraps and cuts a construction worker would encounter?
 

OzSTEEZ

¡ɟɟo ʞɔnɟ ʇunɔ 'ᴉO
Nov 11, 2008
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Oz
No I am not. Greg Louganis refused treatment at the pool because he was poz when he hit his head on the board. He waited until the hospital before he told anyone or got medical coverage. His coach knew and it was his coach that padded his head with towels to get him to the hospital.

His job doesn't require him to come into physical contact with others.
 

Floptical

Doesnt Read Thread Titles
Sep 1, 2006
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pork, where do you draw the line between poz people who you would be around and who you don't want to be near? What scenario? Anything to do with treatment of physical ailments like a doctor, I would assume. And anything that has a possibility of causing an open wound, like a paper cut a secretary might encounter or scraps and cuts a construction worker would encounter?

Now you're just being stupid with this.
 

tre

My favorite chef is Mike Rowave
Oct 15, 2004
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igloo
awesome, five new pages of aids vs. the flu, up next on deadliest warrior...
 

OzSTEEZ

¡ɟɟo ʞɔnɟ ʇunɔ 'ᴉO
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Oz

dbzeag

Wants to kiss you where it stinks
Jun 9, 2006
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Now you're just being stupid with this.

No, I am genuinely confused at porks' standards. Is a surgeon required to specify his status to all his/her patients so they have the choice to choose a different surgeon? Or a nurse?
 

Floptical

Doesnt Read Thread Titles
Sep 1, 2006
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wow, I never knew that's what happened to him.

Professional career ended by HIV

A few days before a scheduled fight against Arthur Weathers in 1996, Morrison tested positive on a mandatory HIV test performed by the Nevada Athletic Commission.[6] Morrison's personal physician administered a confirmatory test, which was also positive.[7] Nevada canceled the fight and placed Morrison on indefinite suspension. At a news conference, a "reflective"[8] Morrison said that he had contracted HIV because of a "very permissive, fast, reckless lifestyle' that involved unprotected sex with multiple partners."[2] Morrison also said that he once thought HIV was a danger only to drug addicts and homosexuals, but that his infection was evidence that HIV "does not discriminate."[2] Morrison stated that he would never fight again.[9] Later in 1996, Morrison announced that he wished to make a comeback with one more bout, the proceeds of which would benefit his newly created KnockOut Aids Foundation.[6][10] To treat his HIV infection, Morrison told the New York Daily News in 2001, he took antiretroviral medication, which reduced his viral load to low levels[7] and according to his promoter, saved his life.[11]



HIV controversy and comeback bid

Beginning in 2006, Morrison launched another comeback bid, alleging that his positive HIV tests had been false positives or that he was a victim of a plot by a rival boxer.[12] The Nevada boxing commission's medical advisory board reviewed Morrison's status and concluded that the HIV positive results were "ironclad and unequivocal."[13] The commission's Keith Kizer stated, "I hope he's HIV negative, I really do, but it doesn't seem likely...We'll wait and see what happens. He said he's been tested several times in recent years, but (we'll ask) what happened from 1996 and 2002, the years he won't talk about."[13] Morrison said he tried to get a copy of the original test results. "We've asked, but they can't come up with it," he said. "I don't think it ever existed."[13] USA Today reported that "Goodman said that's nonsense: 'All Mr. Morrison has to do is contact the laboratory, and they would immediately release the results to him.'"[13]

Unable to box where governing bodies required HIV testing, Morrison had several fights in places where testing was not required.[14][15][16] The Kansas City Star called his last fight, in Wyoming in early 2009, a "staged" event that could be found on YouTube as "Tommy Morrison's fake fight."[3] Morrison also fought an unsanctioned fight on the sovereign territory of the Yavapai-Apache Nation in Arizona, where the state boxing commission does not have jurisdiction. The fight was originally scheduled to follow normal mixed martial arts rules, but was changed on the night of the event to first to exclude ground-fighting, then to exclude kicks, knees, or elbows.[12][17] Where HIV tests were required, Morrison refused to take them. The RACJ, the boxing commission for Quebec, required a routine, supervised HIV test of Morrison in advance of a scheduled 2011 fight. Morrison declined to take the test.[18]

Morrison says he received anywhere from three[19] to six[15] negative HIV test results from the time of his incarceration for a drug conviction in 2000-2001 through 2007, but others dismiss these purported results as fraudulent or forged. Although West Virginia did not require a blood test before Morrison's 2007 fight, Morrison submitted a negative HIV test result "just to satisfy them."[15] However, according to the New York Times, it was not clear that "anyone monitored the...blood draw,"[11] leading to suspicions of switched blood samples. Despite a reported negative test result in Arizona in 2007,[19] the state commission did not clear Morrison to fight, and the Philadelphia Daily News reported that there "seems to be some question about" whether the tested blood was Morrison's own.[2] Also in 2007, the Arizona Republic reported that Morrison had again tested positive for HIV. A former associate alleged that Morrison had tested positive as late as January, 2007, and accused Morrison of "blood tampering and fraud" or forging test results.[12][13] Doctors hired by various news organizations to review Morrison's test results expressed skepticism about the negative results.[11][19][3]

Morrison continued to dispute his HIV-positive status but admitted confusion about the difference between the HIV test, which determines whether a person has contracted the virus, and the viral load test, which measures the level of virus in the blood: "What the doctors would tell me is that the HIV is undetectable. 'We can't find it, but it's not a negative test.' I didn't understand that," he told ESPN.[15] Antiviral medications such as those taken by Morrison after his diagnosis[7] often reduce the amount of circulating virus to an undetectable level, but this does not mean that the person is no longer infected. A test conducted in California found that Morrison was HIV positive but that his viral load was below the limit of detection.[2]

By 2011, Morrison began to make various fringe claims, saying that he was able to teleport himself or regrow limbs, and that he should be able to box without HIV testing because HIV itself does not exist:[3] "I'm living proof that HIV is a myth."[2] He had made a similar statement in 1998, when he told ESPN that "HIV can’t be transmitted sexually anyway, unless it’s man to man. HIV is a harmless disease (sic) that does not cause AIDS."[9] In 2011, the Kansas City Star reported that although Morrison appeared superficially healthy, his skin was sagging, his reflexes were slow, and he had lesions on his hands and arms that resembled Kaposi's sarcoma, an AIDS-defining cancer.[3] HIV, the viral cause of AIDS, has killed millions of individuals worldwide,[20] including several people associated with the boxing industry, such as boxer Ruben Palacios and the former fiancee of HIV-positive boxer Lamar Parks.[2]
 

zengirl

If I had a dollar might give ya 99
Oct 15, 2004
10,255
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How do the new estimates compare with the 36,000 figure that is often cited as an estimate of annual flu-associated deaths?

The 36,000 estimate was presented in a 2003 study by CDC scientists published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)External Web Site Icon, using similar statistical modeling techniques, but only refers to a period from 1990-91 through 1998-99. During those years, the number of estimated deaths ranged from 17,000 to 52,000, with an average of about 36,000. The JAMA study also looked at seasonal influenza-associated deaths over a 23 year period, from 1976-1977 and 1998-1999. During that period, estimates of respiratory and circulatory influenza-associated deaths ranged from about 5,000 to about 52,000, with an average of about 25,000. While the 36,000 number is often cited, it's important to note that during that decade, influenza A (H3N2) was the predominant virus during most of the seasons, and H3N2 influenza viruses are typically associated with higher death rates. CDC believes that the range of deaths over the past 31 years (~3,000 to ~49,000) is a more accurate representation of the unpredictability and variability of flu-associated deaths

CDC does not know exactly how many people die from seasonal flu each year. There are several reasons for this. First, states are not required to report individual seasonal flu cases or deaths of people older than 18 years of age to CDC. Second, seasonal influenza is infrequently listed on death certificates of people who die from flu-related complications. Third, many seasonal flu-related deaths occur one or two weeks after a person’s initial infection, either because the person may develop a secondary bacterial co-infection (such as bacterial pneumonia) or because seasonal influenza can aggravate an existing chronic illness (such as congestive heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Also, most people who die from seasonal flu-related complications are not tested for flu, or they seek medical care later in their illness when seasonal influenza can no longer be detected from respiratory samples. Sensitive influenza tests are only likely to detect influenza if performed within a week after onset of illness. In addition, some commonly used tests to diagnose influenza in clinical settings are not highly sensitive and can provide false negative results (i.e. the misdiagnose flu illness as not being flu.) For these reasons, many flu-related deaths may not be recorded on death certificates. These are some of the reasons that CDC and other public health agencies in the United States and other countries use statistical models to estimate the annual number of seasonal flu-related deaths. (Flu deaths in children were made a nationally notifiable condition in 2004, and since then, states have been required to report flu-related child deaths in the United States through the Influenza Associated Pediatric Mortality Surveillance System).

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/us_flu-related_deaths.htm
Um, Okay?
 

OzSTEEZ

¡ɟɟo ʞɔnɟ ʇunɔ 'ᴉO
Nov 11, 2008
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Oz
pork, where do you draw the line between poz people who you would be around and who you don't want to be near? What scenario? Anything to do with treatment of physical ailments like a doctor, I would assume. And anything that has a possibility of causing an open wound, like a paper cut a secretary might encounter or scraps and cuts a construction worker would encounter?

I've already stated my position on this.

Any occupation which requires physical contact with others should be off limits to HIV positive people.

I have no problem going out to have a beer with someone who is HIV positive.
 

Duke

. . first name's "Daisy" boys
May 12, 2008
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Brandon, FL

Exactly right there is no comparison.

Health and Medicine in the early 1900's compared to medicine since the AIDS discovery in the 1980's can't even be compared. Neither can average living conditions (at least in the US, but also much of western Europe). I have zero doubt that an exact repeat of that epidemic in today's world would not result in the same amount of mortality.

Hell, that was 10 years before the discovery of penicillin.
 

zengirl

If I had a dollar might give ya 99
Oct 15, 2004
10,255
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Look at the figures for the whole world. Look at the figure for how many people contacted the flu in relation to how many died from it. Same with HIV/AIDS

I honestly forgot what you were arguing about
 
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