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Jehannum

HO HO HO METH GIANT
Jul 24, 2013
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That's just people that burn wood.

Like newfoundland is 90% black spruce and fir trees, that's what people burn for firewood, and you save the rare chunk of birch to fire in the woodstove before you go to bed because it'll last the night. And here in NS, where there's way more hardwood in the forests, nobody burns softwood because it creosotes up your chimney quicker and you gotta clean it more often.

Discovered this at the old house where I cut down a big ass spruce tree, tried to give it away for firewood on a local facebook group and nobody wanted it. Some VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTER even piped up how dangerous it was to burn softwood and how nobody should ever do it because it's apparently a massive fire risk, wtf.

Cedar is especially bad for creosoting up chimneys, just like softwood clean your chimney often if you burn a lot of it.
I do once a year. Never had issues yet, and the chimney sweep doesn't say anything about it.

Everything we get here is softwood with the exception of scrub oak, which might as well be.
 

HipHugHer

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Never heard anyone tell me that one before.

The only wood I won't burn is pressure treated timbers.
Fear mongering over oil content, creosote buildup, etc. Maintain your shit and/or burn it the year after you cut and no problem.
 

HipHugHer

Looks like Ted Nugent, Smells like Sasquatch
Apr 18, 2016
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That's just people that burn wood.

Like newfoundland is 90% black spruce and fir trees, that's what people burn for firewood, and you save the rare chunk of birch to fire in the woodstove before you go to bed because it'll last the night. And here in NS, where there's way more hardwood in the forests, nobody burns softwood because it creosotes up your chimney quicker and you gotta clean it more often.

Discovered this at the old house where I cut down a big ass spruce tree, tried to give it away for firewood on a local facebook group and nobody wanted it. Some VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTER even piped up how dangerous it was to burn softwood and how nobody should ever do it because it's apparently a massive fire risk, wtf.

Cedar is especially bad for creosoting up chimneys, just like softwood clean your chimney often if you burn a lot of it.
Growing up we just burned all the downed dead stuff out in the woods whatever it was and never a problem. Ya oak, birch, maple got thrown in just before bedtime to last the night. But we cleaned our stuff every summer, and had a looksee once or twice over the winter to know how things were going, stay ahead of the curve. Heated that way for years just following stuff as it would naturally come down before we ever fell a standing dead one. Never did cut a live one.

The neighbors on the other hand had a chimney fire about every 3 or 4 years. Always put it out before it spread past just the chimney but was kind of a regular thing.
 
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wetwillie

Know-It-All Pee-Paw
May 24, 2018
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Growing up we just burned all the downed dead stuff out in the woods whatever it was and never a problem. Ya oak, birch, maple got thrown in just before bedtime to last the night. But we cleaned our stuff every summer, and had a looksee once or twice over the winter to know how things were going, stay ahead of the curve. Heated that way for years just following stuff as it would naturally come down before we ever fell a standing dead one. Never did cut a live one.

The neighbors on the other hand had a chimney fire about every 3 or 4 years. Always put it out before it spread past just the chimney but was kind of a regular thing.
I just plain hate feeding the stove with softwood. But it's great for getting things started. Nobody even tries to sell softwood here. Maple, oak, hickory. Most trees felled here get ran into a chipper. I'm the paranoid Pete of chimney fires - I own my own brush set and do that prick start of every season. Don't even have to go on the roof - got a slip section above the stove and the fiberglass rod of the brushes bend fine for getting in there. * Gas log in the house.
 
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wetwillie

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FUnny story. I was about 28, had bought my first set of chimney brushes. "Surely I can make money cleaning chimney's for others".
First job, old lady friend of my moms. I think "I can hook an exhaust hose to the shop vac outlet, run it outside and all will be good." It was, until the outlet hose came loose. I was head up the fireplace at time and I heard a loud noise. It was the lady yelling - fucking room was full of soot, her parrot was screeching, her little dog was barking. God was that fucked up. :lol: Good thing she was a bitch before that. :D
 
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Jehannum

HO HO HO METH GIANT
Jul 24, 2013
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Albuquerque, NM
I just plain hate feeding the stove with softwood. But it's great for getting things started. Nobody even tries to sell softwood here. Maple, oak, hickory. Most trees felled here get ran into a chipper. I'm the paranoid Pete of chimney fires - I own my own brush set and do that prick start of every season. Don't even have to go on the roof - got a slip section above the stove and the fiberglass rod of the brushes bend fine for getting in there. * Gas log in the house.
I don't have a stove. The sweep I hire says that the worst buildup comes from stoves, that he never really sees much in regular fireplaces, because most people aren't trying to regulate down the amount of heat that comes out like they might do with the air supply to a wood stove.
 

wetwillie

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I don't have a stove. The sweep I hire says that the worst buildup comes from stoves, that he never really sees much in regular fireplaces, because most people aren't trying to regulate down the amount of heat that comes out like they might do with the air supply to a wood stove.
Yeah, some people choke the fuck out of a stove way too soon. I also have catalytic(change the element every few years) so I usually monitor the stove until I'm blowing 600f+ up the chimney while giing it plenty of air, shove in/on the catalytic and it sometimes peaks around 1000-1050f.:eek:
Smoke is much cleaner when it's going.

Guy across the road from me has a ranch and burns in a stove. But he's cheap - he really needs another section of pipe to get proper draft, we've discussed this. My pole barn chimney is at least 6-8' higher than his. He's always running dirty or struggling when the winds are low. DIrty Dick!
 

HipHugHer

Looks like Ted Nugent, Smells like Sasquatch
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I don't have a stove. The sweep I hire says that the worst buildup comes from stoves, that he never really sees much in regular fireplaces, because most people aren't trying to regulate down the amount of heat that comes out like they might do with the air supply to a wood stove.
Makes sense. A lot of your stuff is going up and out before it can cool and stick too much. A case of inefficiency being a good thing.
 
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HipHugHer

Looks like Ted Nugent, Smells like Sasquatch
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We had a wood stove in the basement, then blower and ductwork to move the heat around the first floor. Those old farmhouses just had what amounts to grate covered holes in the upstairs floor or between the walls to let some heat naturally rise to the 2nd floor. No forced air upstairs. We lived just fine but now days people might see that as an inconvenience or something.
 
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Domon

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Grew up in freezing-ass nowhere with only a wood stove for heat. Worked good to be honest with the exception of one room of the house. Huge chimney that transmitted radiant heat to every room of the house it went through, and a pretty open floor plan that let the heat from the wood stove distribute well without a blower or vents. Stove was right next to the stairs too, so stack effect kept the upstairs nice.
 

HipHugHer

Looks like Ted Nugent, Smells like Sasquatch
Apr 18, 2016
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Grew up in freezing-ass nowhere with only a wood stove for heat. Worked good to be honest with the exception of one room of the house. Huge chimney that transmitted radiant heat to every room of the house it went through, and a pretty open floor plan that let the heat from the wood stove distribute well without a blower or vents. Stove was right next to the stairs too, so stack effect kept the upstairs nice.

Ours was a big cube divided into smaller cubes. 4 rooms upstairs, 4 rooms downstairs. Basement was open aside from support columns. Rock walls and dirt down there. We walled off a corner of it so we could just throw the firewood through the little like 1 ft. X 3 ft. window at the bottom of the house from the outside and it would pile up in that corner "wood room" on the inside.
 
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Domon

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our wood was always meticulously stacked in the woodshed. That was like a 12 hour day of hard labor every fall to cart the wood from about 100 feet away where it got dumped in the driveway to the woodshed that was attached to the house. Fill from one end with the big double doors, and there was another door at the other end of the room, inside the porch that had access from the house to the end of the stack.

3-4 cords a year if i remember right.
 

Jehannum

HO HO HO METH GIANT
Jul 24, 2013
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Albuquerque, NM
our wood was always meticulously stacked in the woodshed. That was like a 12 hour day of hard labor every fall to cart the wood from about 100 feet away where it got dumped in the driveway to the woodshed that was attached to the house. Fill from one end with the big double doors, and there was another door at the other end of the room, inside the porch that had access from the house to the end of the stack.

3-4 cords a year if i remember right.
It took my kids a solid hour to move 1 cord 15 feet from the side of the driveway to the side of the house behind the gate.

They did a passable job stacking, but I'm going to have to burn some soon, because it's too close to the wood section of the fence.

I'm not posting a picture because there's the old cut up frame of the kids' roadster, plus the fenderwell and front grill that they cut off in frame, and y'all are judgy cunts.
 
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HipHugHer

Looks like Ted Nugent, Smells like Sasquatch
Apr 18, 2016
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our wood was always meticulously stacked in the woodshed. That was like a 12 hour day of hard labor every fall to cart the wood from about 100 feet away where it got dumped in the driveway to the woodshed that was attached to the house. Fill from one end with the big double doors, and there was another door at the other end of the room, inside the porch that had access from the house to the end of the stack.

3-4 cords a year if i remember right.
We cut ours out of the woods that were part of the farm. Most of it fallen dead, some standing dead. Then there was a thing going around up there called Dutch elm disease that took out a lot of elm so in the later years we burned a lot of elm. That shit sucks to split. Long stringy strands that cling together like @Strings best glue. Even with an engine powered hydraulic splitter you'd have to work the last bit by hand as often as not.
Later when the help (me and later my brother) got older and would eventually move away they got a propane furnace and a big tank for it. Commercial fuel truck delivery and presto, heat.
 

Strings

Stuck with this Shitty Title
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We cut ours out of the woods that were part of the farm. Most of it fallen dead, some standing dead. Then there was a thing going around up there called Dutch elm disease that took out a lot of elm so in the later years we burned a lot of elm. That shit sucks to split. Long stringy strands that cling together like @Strings best glue. Even with an engine powered hydraulic splitter you'd have to work the last bit by hand as often as not.
Later when the help (me and later my brother) got older and would eventually move away they got a propane furnace and a big tank for it. Commercial fuel truck delivery and presto, heat.

Now you truly understand where my name comes from.
 

HipHugHer

Looks like Ted Nugent, Smells like Sasquatch
Apr 18, 2016
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It took my kids a solid hour to move 1 cord 15 feet from the side of the driveway to the side of the house behind the gate.

They did a passable job stacking, but I'm going to have to burn some soon, because it's too close to the wood section of the fence.

I'm not posting a picture because there's the old cut up frame of the kids' roadster, plus the fenderwell and front grill that they cut off in frame, and y'all are judgy cunts.
I don't trust anybody who ain't got at least a few car parts laying around the yard.
Clean and dress right dress just means you're hiding something.
 
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wetwillie

Know-It-All Pee-Paw
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We had a wood stove in the basement, then blower and ductwork to move the heat around the first floor. Those old farmhouses just had what amounts to grate covered holes in the upstairs floor or between the walls to let some heat naturally rise to the 2nd floor. No forced air upstairs. We lived just fine but now days people might see that as an inconvenience or something.
My first house was like that - big gravity furnace in the basement that only vented to 3 huge pipes. I built a stove from 2, 55 gallon drums and heated it mostly by wood for 8 years. Like your folks I just opened a window and threw that shit in. Maybe stacked some of it later.. Maybe.
 
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